The Lead Guitar Improv Course


(demo starts at 4:45)

 

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Here is a 10-minute screenshot video to check out as well…


 

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Check out the Course Outline Below!


Interactive Course Outline
(Click on any section to expand the contents of that section)

Section 1 - The Minor Pentatonic Scale Framework


Section 1: Lesson – Section Introduction

1-1: Lesson – The 1st Minor Pentatonic Position (aka. the “Home Box”)

Demo – Improvisation in the 1st Minor Pentatonic Position

1-2: Lesson – Everything Repeats Itself After the 12th Fret

Demo – Improvisation Using the 1st Minor Pentatonic Position Lower and Higher on the Fretboard

1-3: Lesson – Expanding the Minor Pentatonic Scale to 2 Positions

Demo – Improvisation Using 2 Minor Pentatonic Positions

1-4: Lesson – Expanding the Minor Pentatonic Scale to 3 Positions

Demo – Improvisation Using 3 Minor Pentatonic Positions

1-5: Lesson – Minor Pentatonic Position #4 (aka. the “A-string Home Box”)

Demo – Improvisation Using the Entire Fretboard with Emphasis on Position #4

1-6: Lesson – Applying the Minor Pentatonic Scale Patterns to a Key that You aren’t Comfortable Playing in

Demo – Improvisation Using the Entire Fretboard in an Unfamiliar Minor Key


Section 2 - The Major Pentatonic Scale Framework


Section 2: Lesson – Section Introduction

2-1: Lesson – The 1st Major Pentatonic Position (aka. The “Home Box”)

Demo – Improvisation in the 1st Major Pentatonic Position

2-2: Lesson – Expanding the Major Pentatonic Scale to 2 Positions

Demo – Improvisation Using 2 Major Pentatonic Positions

2-3: Lesson – Expanding the pentatonic scale to 3 positions

Demo – Improvisation Using 3 Major Pentatonic Positions

2-4: Lesson – Major Pentatonic Position #4 (aka “The A-String Home Box”)

Demo – Improvisation Using the Entire Fretboard with Emphasis on Position #4

2-5: Lesson – Applying the Major Pentatonic Scale Patterns to an Unfamiliar Major Key

Demo – Improvisation Using the Entire Fretboard in an Unfamiliar Major Key


Section 3 - Understanding the Relationship Between Major and Minor Keys


Section 4 - The Blues Scale Framework: Adding the Blue Note to the 5 Pentatonic Positions


Section 4: Lesson – Section Introduction

4-1-1: Demo – Pentatonic position #1 with the added “blue note” (minor key)

4-1-2: Demo – Pentatonic position #2 with the added “blue note” (minor key)

4-1-3: Demo – Pentatonic position #3 with the added “blue note” (minor key)

4-1-4: Demo – Pentatonic position #4 with the added “blue note” (minor key)

4-1-5: Demo – Pentatonic position #5 with the added “blue note” (minor key)

4-2-1: Demo – Pentatonic position #1 with the added “blue note” (major key)

4-2-2: Demo – Pentatonic position #2 with the added “blue note” (major key)

4-2-3: Demo – Pentatonic position #3 with the added “blue note” (major key)

4-2-4: Demo – Pentatonic position #4 with the added “blue note” (major key)

4-2-5: Demo – Pentatonic position #5 with the added “blue note” (major key)

4-3-1: Demo – The blues scale across the entire fretboard (minor keys) 

4-3-2: Demo – The blues scale across the entire fretboard (major keys) 


Section 5 - The Diatonic Scale Framework: Adding the Melodic Notes


Section 5: Lesson – Section Introduction

5-1: Lesson – The “Home Box” (aka. Pentatonic Position #1) (Major Key)

Demo – Improvising with the Diatonic Scale in the “Home Box” Position (Major Key)

5-2: Lesson – The “A-String Home Box” (aka. Pentatonic Position #4) (Major Key)

Demo – Now Adding the “A-String Home Box” Position into the Improvisation (Major Key)

5-3: Lesson – The “3-Note-Per-String” Scale Area (the Remainder of the Fretboard) (Major Key)

Demo – Improvising Within the “3 Note Per String” Remaining Area of the Fretboard (Major Key)

5-4: Lesson – Applying these 3 Diatonic Scale “Patterns” to any of the 12 Major Keys

Demo – Improvising Using the Diatonic Scale Across the Entire Fretboard for a Major Key

5-5: Lesson – The “Home Box” (aka. Pentatonic Position #1) (Minor Key)

Demo – Improvising with the Diatonic Scale in the “Home Box” Position (Minor Key)

5-6: Lesson – The “A-String Home Box” (aka. Pentatonic Position #4) (Minor Key)

Demo – Now Adding the “A-String Home Box” Position into the Improvisation (Minor Key)

5-7: Lesson – The “3-Note-Per-String” Scale Area (the Remainder of the Fretboard) (Minor Key)

Demo – Improvising Within the “3 Note Per String” Remaining Area of the Fretboard (Minor Key)

5-8: Lesson – Applying these 3 Diatonic Scale “Patterns” to any of the 12 Minor Keys

Demo – Improvising Using the Diatonic Scale Across the Entire Fretboard for a Minor Key


Section 6 - Scale Combining - Combining the Pentatonic, Blues, and Diatonic Scales Together


Section 7 - Introduction to Arpeggios/Chord Tone Targeting


Section 7: Lesson – Section Introduction

7-1: Demo – Arpeggio Practice for the “I Chord” of a Major Key

7-2: Demo – Arpeggio Practice for the “i Chord” of a Minor Key


Section 8 - Chord Tone Targeting With Barre Chords


Section 8: Lesson – Section Introduction

8-1: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting with Barre Chords over a i – iv – v Progression in A Minor

8-2: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting with Barre Chords over a I – IV – V Progression in A Major


Section 9 - Chord Tone Targeting the 3 Major and 3 Minor Chords in Each Key


Section 9: Lesson – Section Introduction

9-1: Lesson – All 6 Diatonic Chords in the “Home Box”

Demo – Improvising with Chord Tones in the “Home Box”

9-2: Lesson – All 6 Diatonic Chords in the “A-String Home Box”

Demo – Improvising with Chord Tones in the “A-String Home Box”

9-3: Lesson – All 6 Diatonic Chords in the Remaining “3-Note-Per-String” Pattern

Demo – Improvising with Chord Tones in this “3-Note-Per-String” Pattern

9-4: Lesson – How to Approach Chord Tone Targeting in an Unfamiliar Major Key

Demo – Improvising with Chord Tones over a IV – I – V – vi Progression

9-5: Lesson – How to Approach Chord Tone Targeting in an Unfamiliar Minor Key

Demo – Improvising with Chord Tones over a ii – vi –  iii – V Progression

9-6: Demo – Improvising over an Easy 2-Chord Progression at a Slower Tempo in a Major Key

9-7: Demo – Improvising over an Easy 2-Chord Progression at a Slower Tempo in a Minor Key


Section 10 - Introduction to Modes as Related to the Parent Major Scale


Section 10: Lesson – Section Introduction

10-1: Demo – Soloing over a Chord Progression “In Key”, and then “Switching Modes”

10-2: Demo – Improvisation in the A Ionian Mode

10-3: Demo – Improvisation in the A Dorian Mode

10-4: Demo – Improvisation in the A Phrygian Mode

10-5: Demo – Improvisation in the A Lydian Mode

10-6: Demo – Improvisation in the A Mixolydian Mode

10-7: Demo – Improvisation in the A Aeolian Mode

10-8: Demo – Improvisation in the A Locrian Mode


Section 11 - The Harmonic Minor Scale Framework


Section 11: Lesson – Section Introduction

11-1: Lesson – The Harmonic Minor Scale in the “Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation Using the Harmonic Minor Scale in the “Home Box” Position

11-2: Lesson – Harmonic Minor Scale in the “A-String Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation Using the Harmonic Minor Scale in the “A-String Home Box” Position

11-3: Lesson – Harmonic Minor Scale in the “3-Note-Per-String” Area

Demo – Improvisation Using the Harmonic Minor Scale in the “3-Note-Per-String” Area

11-4: Lesson – Applying the 3 Harmonic Minor Scale Patterns to any of the 12 Minor Keys

Demo – Improvising With the Harmonic Minor Scale Across the Entire Fretboard in an Unfamiliar Key


Section 12 - Combining the Natural Minor and Harmonic Minor Scales Together


Section 12: Lesson – Section Introduction

12-1: Lesson – The Roman Numeral Numbering System for Minor Keys

Demo – Combining the Natural Minor and Harmonic Minor Scale Over a 2-Chord Progression

12-2: Demo – Improvisation Over a 4-Chord Progression

12-3: Lesson – Using the Harmonic Minor Scale in Both Major and Minor Keys

Demo – Improvisation Over a Chord Progression that Could be Considered Either Major or Minor

12-4: Lesson – Combining the Harmonic Minor Scale with the MAJOR Scale

Demo – Combining the Harmonic Minor Scale with the Major Scale


Section 13 - Targeting Chord Tones/Arpeggio Practice Within the Natural Minor/Harmonic Minor Framework


Section 13: Lesson – Section Introduction

13-1: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – V Progression

13-2: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – bVII – bVI – V Progression

13-3: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – bVII – bIII – bVI – V – i Progression

13-4: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a I – III – IV – V Progression


Section 14 - The Dorian Mode Framework


Section 14: Lesson – Section Introduction

14-1: Lesson – Modal Chord Progressions

14-2: Lesson – The Dorian Mode in the “Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “Home Box” Position of the Dorian Mode

14-3: Lesson – The Dorian Mode in the “A-String Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “A-String Home Box” Position of the Dorian Mode

14-4: Lesson – The Dorian Mode in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position of the Dorian Mode

14-5: Lesson – Improvising Within the Dorian Mode Framework in an Unfamiliar Mode

Demo – Improvisation in C Dorian over a 2-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard

14-6: Demo – Improvisation in C Dorian over a 3-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard


Section 15 - Scale Combining the Dorian Mode with the Minor Pentatonic/Minor Blues Scale


Section 15: Lesson – Section Introduction

15-1: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Dorian Mode Framework Over a 2-Chord Progression

15-2: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Dorian Mode Framework Over a 3-Chord Progression


Section 16 - Chord Tone Targeting/Arpeggio Practice Within the Dorian Mode Framework


Section 16: Lesson – Section Introduction

16-1: Lesson – The Characteristic Chord of the Dorian Mode

16-2: Demo – Arpeggio Practice over the “i chord” within the Dorian Mode Framework

16-3: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – IV Progression

16-4: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – IV – bVII – IV Progression


Section 17 - The Phrygian Mode Framework


Section 17: Lesson – Section Introduction

17-1: Lesson – The Phrygian Mode in the “Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “Home Box” Position of the Phrygian Mode

17-2: Lesson – The Phrygian Mode in the “A-String Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “A-String Home Box” Position of the Phrygian Mode

17-3: Lesson – The Phrygian Mode in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position of the Phrygian Mode

17-4: Lesson – Improvising Within the Phrygian Mode Framework in an Unfamiliar Mode

Demo – Improvisation in C# Phrygian over a 2-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard

17-5: Demo – Improvisation in A Phrygian over a 3-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard


Section 18 - Scale Combining the Phrygian Mode and the Minor Pentatonic/Minor Blues Scale


Section 18: Lesson – Section Introduction

18-1: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Phrygian Mode Framework Over a 2-Chord Progression

18-2: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Phrygian Mode Framework Over a 3-Chord Progression


Section 19 - Chord Tone Targeting/Arpeggio Practice Within the Phrygian Mode Framework


Section 19: Lesson – Section Introduction

19-1: Lesson – The Characteristic Chord of the Phrygian Mode

19-2: Demo – Arpeggio Practice over the “i chord” within the Phrygian Mode Framework 

19-3: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – bII Progression

19-4: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – bII – bvii Progression


Section 20 - The Lydian Mode Framework


Section 20: Lesson – Section Introduction

20-1: Lesson – The Lydian Mode in the “Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “Home Box” Position of the Lydian Mode

20-2: Lesson – The Lydian Mode in the “A-String Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “A-String Home Box” Position of the Lydian Mode

20-3: Lesson – The Lydian Mode in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position of the Lydian Mode

20-4: Lesson – Improvising Within the Lydian Mode Framework in an Unfamiliar Mode

Demo – Improvisation in Db Lydian over a 2-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard

20-5: Demo – Improvisation in A Lydian over a 3-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard


Section 21 - Combining the Lydian Mode and the Major Pentatonic/Major Blues Scale Together


Section 21: Lesson – Section Introduction

21-1: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Lydian Mode Framework Over a 2-Chord Progression

21-2: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Lydian Mode Framework Over a 3-Chord Progression


Section 22 - Chord Tone Targeting/Arpeggio Practice Within the Lydian Mode Framework


Section 22: Lesson – Section Introduction

22-1: Lesson – The Characteristic Chord of the Lydian Mode

22-2: Demo – Arpeggio Practice over the “I chord” within the 
Lydian Mode Framework 

22-3: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a I – II Progression

22-4: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a I – II – vi – II Progression


Section 23 - The Mixolydian Mode Framework


Section 23: Lesson – Section Introduction

23-1: Lesson – The Mixolydian Mode in the “Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “Home Box” Position of the Mixolydian Mode

23-2: Lesson – The Lydian Mode in the “A-String Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “A-String Home Box” Position of the Mixolydian Mode

23-3: Lesson – The Mixolydian Mode in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position of the Mixolydian Mode

23-4: Lesson – Improvising Within the Mixolydian Mode Framework in an Unfamiliar Mode

Demo – Improvisation in Db Mixolydian over a 2-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard

23-5: Demo – Improvisation in A Mixolydian over a 3-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard


Section 24 - Combining the Mixolydian Mode and the Major Pentatonic/Major Blues Scale Together


Section 24: Lesson – Section Introduction

24-1: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Mixolydian Mode Framework Over a 2-Chord Progression

24-2: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Mixolydian Mode Framework Over a 3-Chord Progression


Section 25 - Chord Tone Targeting/Arpeggio Practice Within the Mixolydian Mode Framework


Section 25: Lesson – Section Introduction

25-1: Lesson – The Characteristic Chord of the Mixolydian Mode

25-2: Demo – Arpeggio Practice over the “I chord” within the Mixolydian Mode Framework 

25-3: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a I – II Progression

25-4: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a I – II – vi – II Progression


TONS of additional video backing tracks to practice with can be found on the Video Library Page:

Go to Video Library


Questions, Comments, or Requests?

(In order to avoid spam, all questions and comments are held in queue until I approve them. So if you post here, and it doesn’t show up right away, just hold tight and I will definitely respond to you shortly!)

16 comments… add one
  • Jaap Jacobs Sep 24, 2017, 3:40 pm

    Hello Brian,

    Though there are problems with my internet connection I decided to buy this life time course and your diagramms, because:
    I have the feeling I can learn a lot from it
    I want to support you, because I found lots of valuable information through your You Tube video’s
    I wish you lots of succes,

    Kind regards,

    Jacob

    • Brian Kelly Sep 24, 2017, 5:25 pm

      Hey thanks a lot! I really appreciate it. I think you will learn a lot as well. Also, I am constantly adding to this course as well. I have A LOT more material that I will be adding each and every week. Thanks again for the support!

      Sincerely,

      Brian

      • gerald monahan Dec 16, 2017, 9:23 am

        I’ll say it again your site is terrific for anyone who really wants to learn how to improvise. I spent years trying to learn how to play songs of others. Your course has given me the skills to play my music.

        • Brian Kelly Dec 16, 2017, 10:50 am

          Hey Gerald,

          That’s great man! That was my intent when designing the course. I’m glad you like it. If you have any questions, feel free to ask!

          Brian

  • Brian Kelly Oct 6, 2017, 11:35 am

    Hey, I replied to this question via. email the other day when you left the comment. I just wanted to make sure you got the reply and if I was able to answer your question for ya.

  • Dougsjojo Dec 13, 2017, 5:29 am

    Thanks, watching the into you are so right. Playing along leads eat. show ware I’m wrong is to me great. Thanks Doug

    • Brian Kelly Dec 13, 2017, 9:40 am

      Hi Doug,

      Great to hear that you are finding playing along with the video backing tracks to be helpful! Let me know if you have any questions!

      Brian

    • Brian Kelly Dec 27, 2017, 12:25 pm

      Hey Tony,

      Great to hear that you like the course. What do you mean the video sample though? Are there certain videos that you are unable to view?

  • Dennis Breda Dec 22, 2017, 9:56 pm

    You have in depth knowledge of music and its application to guitar. You also have nearly excellent presentation skills. I am curious as to your educational background, either formal or in formal. Are you a college music major or …?

    • Brian Kelly Dec 22, 2017, 10:57 pm

      Hey Dennis,

      Thanks for the comment! I wasn’t a music major; I have an engineering degree. I did take a few music theory classes in college though, plus I read a bunch of music theory books and took sporadic guitar lessons throughout the years. I’m a lifelong student of music! Making this course is definitely the most fun project I ever took on :).

  • gerald monahan Jan 7, 2018, 2:08 pm

    I make my living practicing law but my passion has always been music–a left brain, right brain thing. Do you combine engineering and music? If so, how is that working out for you? In any event I look forward to your new lessons.

    • Brian Kelly Jan 15, 2018, 11:26 pm

      I thought I left a reply to this…It was kind of a long answer. Anyway, the short answer is – nope not really. I do have a very “math/logical” brain, which is why I enjoy music theory so much. There’s always an explanation for everything…I pretty much just dropped engineering back in 2012 and decided to dedicate my life to music. I’ve been doing so ever since, and it is awesome!

  • Phil James Jan 13, 2018, 5:58 pm

    Great lessons, fantastic teacher and methods ….. really glad I invested in this course/website.
    Thanks Brian….

    • Brian Kelly Jan 14, 2018, 9:44 pm

      Thanks so much for the support! I have lots more stuff that I will be adding to this course…I can’t wait until the video library is up (shooting for mid-February)!

  • Phillip Ziegler Feb 10, 2018, 6:17 pm

    I have a blues guitar teacher who has been terrific. And I have watched many You Tube videos that have been helpful. But when I wanted to dig below the surface it was your videos that made the difference. And so I bought a lifetime membership both for the content and to support your efforts. Also working my way thought the ebook. I love playing and I also love learning theory in anything I take up.

    • Brian Kelly Feb 10, 2018, 10:23 pm

      Hey thanks for the support Phil! I really appreciate it! Let me know if you have any questions, and I’ll be glad to help.

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