The Lead Guitar Improv Course



(Demo starts at 4:45)

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Check out the Course Outline Below!


Interactive Course Outline

Section 1: Lesson – The Minor Pentatonic Scale

1-1: Lesson – The 1st Minor Pentatonic Position (aka. the “Home Box”)

Demo – Improvisation in the 1st Minor Pentatonic Position

1-2: Lesson – Everything Repeats Itself After the 12th Fret

Demo – Improvisation Using the 1st Minor Pentatonic Position Lower and Higher on the Fretboard

1-3: Lesson – Expanding the Minor Pentatonic Scale to 2 Positions

Demo – Improvisation Using 2 Minor Pentatonic Positions

1-4: Lesson – Expanding the Minor Pentatonic Scale to 3 Positions

Demo – Improvisation Using 3 Minor Pentatonic Positions

1-5: Lesson – Minor Pentatonic Position #4 (aka. the “A-string Home Box”)

Demo – Improvisation Using the Entire Fretboard with Emphasis on Position #4

1-6: Lesson – Applying the Minor Pentatonic Scale Patterns to a Key that You aren’t Comfortable Playing in

Demo – Improvisation Using the Entire Fretboard in an Unfamiliar Minor Key


Section 2: Lesson – The Major Pentatonic Scale

2-1: Lesson – The 1st Major Pentatonic Position (aka. The “Home Box”)

Demo – Improvisation in the 1st Major Pentatonic Position

2-2: Lesson – Expanding the Major Pentatonic Scale to 2 Positions

Demo – Improvisation Using 2 Major Pentatonic Positions

2-3: Lesson – Expanding the pentatonic scale to 3 positions – major keys

Demo – Improvisation Using 3 Major Pentatonic Positions

2-4: Lesson – Major Pentatonic Position #4 (aka “The A-String Home Box”)

Demo – Improvisation Using the Entire Fretboard with Emphasis on Position #4

2-5: Lesson – Applying the Major Pentatonic Scale Patterns to an Unfamiliar Major Key

Demo – Improvisation Using the Entire Fretboard in an Unfamiliar Major Key


Section 3: Lesson – Understanding the Relationship Between Major and Minor

3-1: Lesson – Applying the Relative Major/Minor Concept to Solos/Improvisation

Demo – Improvisation Starting in a Major Key, then Switching to its’ Relative Minor


Section 4: Lesson – Adding the “Blue Note” to Each of the 5 Pentatonic Positions to Create the Blues Scale

4-1-1: Demo – Pentatonic position #1 with the added “blue note” (minor key)

4-1-2: Demo – Pentatonic position #2 with the added “blue note” (minor key)

4-1-3: Demo – Pentatonic position #3 with the added “blue note” (minor key)

4-1-4: Demo – Pentatonic position #4 with the added “blue note” (minor key)

4-1-5: Demo – Pentatonic position #5 with the added “blue note” (minor key)

4-2-1: Demo – Pentatonic position #1 with the added “blue note” (major key)

4-2-2: Demo – Pentatonic position #2 with the added “blue note” (major key)

4-2-3: Demo – Pentatonic position #3 with the added “blue note” (major key)

4-2-4: Demo – Pentatonic position #4 with the added “blue note” (major key)

4-2-5: Demo – Pentatonic position #5 with the added “blue note” (major key)

4-3-1: Demo – The blues scale across the entire fretboard (minor keys) 

4-3-2: Demo – The blues scale across the entire fretboard (major keys) 


Section 5: Lesson – Full Diatonic Scale – Adding the Melodic Notes

5-1: Lesson – The “Home Box” (aka. Pentatonic Position #1) (Major Key)

Demo – Improvising with the Diatonic Scale in the “Home Box” Position (Major Key)

5-2: Lesson – The “A-String Home Box” (aka. Pentatonic Position #4) (Major Key)

Demo – Now Adding the “A-String Home Box” Position into the Improvisation (Major Key)

5-3: Lesson – The “3-Note-Per-String” Scale Area (the Remainder of the Fretboard) (Major Key)

Demo – Improvising Within the “3 Note Per String” Remaining Area of the Fretboard (Major Key)

5-4: Lesson – Applying these 3 Diatonic Scale “Patterns” to any of the 12 Major Keys

Demo – Improvising Using the Diatonic Scale Across the Entire Fretboard for a Major Key

5-5: Lesson – The “Home Box” (aka. Pentatonic Position #1) (Minor Key)

Demo – Improvising with the Diatonic Scale in the “Home Box” Position (Minor Key)

5-6: Lesson – The “A-String Home Box” (aka. Pentatonic Position #4) (Minor Key)

Demo – Now Adding the “A-String Home Box” Position into the Improvisation (Minor Key)

5-7: Lesson – The “3-Note-Per-String” Scale Area (the Remainder of the Fretboard) (Minor Key)

Demo – Improvising Within the “3 Note Per String” Remaining Area of the Fretboard (Minor Key)

5-8: Lesson – Applying these 3 Diatonic Scale “Patterns” to any of the 12 Minor Keys

Demo – Improvising Using the Diatonic Scale Across the Entire Fretboard for a Minor Key


Section 6: Lesson – Scale Combining

6-1: Demo – Combining the Pentatonic, Diatonic, and Blues Scale in a Major/Minor Key


Section 7: Lesson – Arpeggios (aka. “Chord Tones”)

7-1: Demo – Arpeggio Practice for the “I Chord” of a Major Key

7-2: Demo – Arpeggio Practice for the “i Chord” of a Minor Key


Section 8: Lesson – Chord Tone Targeting with Barre Chords

8-1: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting with Barre Chords over a i – iv – v Progression in A Minor

8-2: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting with Barre Chords over a I – IV – V Progression in A Major


Section 9: Lesson – Chord Tone Targeting all 6 Diatonic Chords

9-1: Lesson – All 6 Diatonic Chords in the “Home Box”

Demo – Improvising with Chord Tones in the “Home Box”

9-2: Lesson – All 6 Diatonic Chords in the “A-String Home Box”

Demo – Improvising with Chord Tones in the “A-String Home Box”

9-3: Lesson – All 6 Diatonic Chords in the Remaining “3-Note-Per-String” Pattern

Demo – Improvising with Chord Tones in this “3-Note-Per-String” Pattern

9-4: Lesson – How to Approach Chord Tone Targeting in an Unfamiliar Major Key

Demo – Improvising with Chord Tones over a IV – I – V – vi Progression

9-5: Lesson – How to Approach Chord Tone Targeting in an Unfamiliar Minor Key

Demo – Improvising with Chord Tones over a ii – vi –  iii – V Progression

9-6: Demo – Improvising over an Easy 2-Chord Progression at a Slower Tempo in a Major Key

9-7: Demo – Improvising over an Easy 2-Chord Progression at a Slower Tempo in a Minor Key


Section 10: Lesson – Modes: How and When to use Them

10-1: Demo – Soloing over a Chord Progression “In Key”, and then “Switching Modes”

10-2: Demo – Improvisation in the A Ionian Mode

10-3: Demo – Improvisation in the A Dorian Mode

10-4: Demo – Improvisation in the A Phrygian Mode

10-5: Demo – Improvisation in the A Lydian Mode

10-6: Demo – Improvisation in the A Mixolydian Mode

10-7: Demo – Improvisation in the A Aeolian Mode

10-8: Demo – Improvisation in the A Locrian Mode


Section 11: Lesson – The Harmonic Minor Scale

11-1: Lesson – The Harmonic Minor Scale in the “Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation Using the Harmonic Minor Scale in the “Home Box” Position

11-2: Lesson – Harmonic Minor Scale in the “A-String Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation Using the Harmonic Minor Scale in the “A-String Home Box” Position

11-3: Lesson – Harmonic Minor Scale in the “3-Note-Per-String” Area

Demo – Improvisation Using the Harmonic Minor Scale in the “3-Note-Per-String” Area

11-4: Lesson – Applying the 3 Harmonic Minor Scale Patterns to any of the 12 Minor Keys

Demo – Improvising With the Harmonic Minor Scale Across the Entire Fretboard in an Unfamiliar Key


Section 12: Lesson – Combining the Natural Minor and Harmonic Minor Scale Together

12-1: Lesson – The Roman Numeral Numbering System for Minor Keys

Demo – Combining the Natural Minor and Harmonic Minor Scale Over a 2-Chord Progression

12-2: Demo – Improvisation Over a 4-Chord Progression

12-3: Lesson – Using the Harmonic Minor Scale in Both Major and Minor Keys

Demo – Improvisation Over a Chord Progression that Could be Considered Either Major or Minor

12-4: Lesson – Combining the Harmonic Minor Scale with the MAJOR Scale

Demo – Combining the Harmonic Minor Scale with the Major Scale


Section 13: Lesson – Chord Tone Targeting Within the Natural Minor-Harmonic Minor Scale Framework

13-1: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – V Progression

13-2: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – bVII – bVI – V Progression

13-3: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – bVII – bIII – bVI – V – i Progression

13-4: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a I – III – IV – V Progression


Section 14: Lesson – The Dorian Mode

14-1: Lesson – Modal Chord Progressions

14-2: Lesson – The Dorian Mode in the “Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “Home Box” Position of the Dorian Mode

14-3: Lesson – The Dorian Mode in the “A-String Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “A-String Home Box” Position of the Dorian Mode

14-4: Lesson – The Dorian Mode in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position of the Dorian Mode

14-5: Lesson – Improvising Within the Dorian Mode Framework in an Unfamiliar Mode

Demo – Improvisation in C Dorian over a 2-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard

14-6: Demo – Improvisation in C Dorian over a 3-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard


Section 15: Lesson – Combining the Dorian Mode with the Minor Pentatonic/Minor Blues Scale

15-1: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Dorian Mode Framework Over a 2-Chord Progression

15-2: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Dorian Mode Framework Over a 3-Chord Progression


Section 16: Lesson – Chord Tone Targeting Within the Dorian Mode Framework

16-1: Lesson – The Characteristic Chord of the Dorian Mode

16-2: Demo – Arpeggio Practice over the “i chord” within the Dorian Mode Framework

16-3: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – IV Progression

16-4: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – IV – bVII – IV Progression


Section 17: Lesson – The Phrygian Mode

17-1: Lesson – The Phrygian Mode in the “Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “Home Box” Position of the Phrygian Mode

17-2: Lesson – The Phrygian Mode in the “A-String Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “A-String Home Box” Position of the Phrygian Mode

17-3: Lesson – The Phrygian Mode in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position of the Phrygian Mode

17-4: Lesson – Improvising Within the Phrygian Mode Framework in an Unfamiliar Mode

Demo – Improvisation in C# Phrygian over a 2-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard

17-5: Demo – Improvisation in A Phrygian over a 3-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard


Section 18: Lesson – Combining the Phrygian Mode with the Minor Pentatonic/Minor Blues Scale

18-1: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Phrygian Mode Framework Over a 2-Chord Progression

18-2: Demo – Scale Combining Within the Phrygian Mode Framework Over a 3-Chord Progression


Section 19: Lesson – Chord Tone Targeting Within the Phrygian Mode Framework

19-1: Lesson – The Characteristic Chord of the Phrygian Mode

19-2: Demo – Arpeggio Practice over the “i chord” within the Phrygian Mode Framework 

19-3: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – bII Progression

19-4: Demo – Chord Tone Targeting over a i – bII – bvii Progression


Section 20: Lesson – The Lydian Mode

20-1: Lesson – The Lydian Mode in the “Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “Home Box” Position of the Lydian Mode

20-2: Lesson – The Lydian Mode in the “A-String Home Box” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “A-String Home Box” Position of the Lydian Mode

20-3: Lesson – The Lydian Mode in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position

Demo – Improvisation in the “3-Note-Per-String” Position of the Lydian Mode

20-4: Lesson – Improvising Within the Lydian Mode Framework in an Unfamiliar Mode

Demo – Improvisation in Db Lydian over a 2-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard

20-5: Demo – Improvisation in A Lydian over a 3-Chord Progression Using the Entire Fretboard


Additional Video Backing Tracks for Practice

Spanish Groove in A minor (vi – ii7 – IV – V progression)

2-Chord Country Jam in G major (I – IV progression)

Slow Metal Ballad in E minor (vi – IV – V progression)

A Dorian Mode Jam (i – IV progression)

A Phrygian Mode Jam (i – bII progression)

A Lydian Mode Jam (I – II progression)


Questions, Comments, or Requests?

6 comments… add one
  • jacob Sep 19, 2017, 2:30 pm

    Hello Brian,
    I’m working on your chord tone soloing series on You tube ( downloadable!) now. I’m busy with lesson 6 and I wonder:
    There is a lot to write down, when you want all the positions ( shapes, penta scales , chord notes, additional notes etc.) on paper. Are the drawings you put on the top in every video in the improv course on PDF? Can you further give me an estimation when this course is downloadable???

    Thank you and have a nice day,

    Kind regards,

    Jacob

    • Brian Kelly Sep 19, 2017, 4:55 pm

      Hey Jacob,

      Regarding the full fretboard drawings…I have them all in my eBook here: Scales, Arpeggios, and Modes.

      Regarding making the videos in the course downloadable…I don’t think that I am going to be making them downloadable. This is simply just to protect myself from having my stuff stolen/pirated. I’m sorry to hear that streaming videos off the internet doesn’t work well where you are located.

      Regarding taking notes from any of the free videos…A free alternative to getting the eBook would be to simply take a screenshot of anything in any video that you would want to save. If you’re on a PC you can screenshot by hitting the “windows button+print scrn”, then go to your pictures folder and find the “screenshots” folder in there. I’m not sure how to do it on a Mac, but you could always look that up.

  • Jaap Jacobs Sep 24, 2017, 3:40 pm

    Hello Brian,

    Though there are problems with my internet connection I decided to buy this life time course and your diagramms, because:
    I have the feeling I can learn a lot from it
    I want to support you, because I found lots of valuable information through your You Tube video’s
    I wish you lots of succes,

    Kind regards,

    Jacob

    • Brian Kelly Sep 24, 2017, 5:25 pm

      Hey thanks a lot! I really appreciate it. I think you will learn a lot as well. Also, I am constantly adding to this course as well. I have A LOT more material that I will be adding each and every week. Thanks again for the support!

      Sincerely,

      Brian

  • Jaap Jacobs Oct 3, 2017, 3:06 am

    Hello Brian,
    In this impro (Demo – Improvisation in the 1st Minor Pentatonic Position) you are soloing. It sounds good, but I don’t know how to start this, can you give me some clues or can you refer me to lessons where I can learn this in a slow way?

    Thanks,

    Jaap

    • Brian Kelly Oct 6, 2017, 11:35 am

      Hey, I replied to this question via. email the other day when you left the comment. I just wanted to make sure you got the reply and if I was able to answer your question for ya.

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